Language

 Jan Železný - CZECH JAVELIN THROWER - WORLD RECORDHOLDER

 

First coach was his father Jaroslav, a javelin thrower also, like is mother Jana. First sport: handball. Five world javelin records, including the actual one of 98.48. Won 106 of 135 competitions 1991-2001 and achieved 34 performances over 90.00. Won 4 GP javelin and 3 times was 2nd overall. Serious junjured during the season 1998, but he was back in 1999 completely recovered. His best result at EC is 3rd in 1994. IAAF Athlete of the Year 2000. In December 1999 he was elected a member of IOC, having already been a member of IOC's athletes Commision. (from IAAF link)

 From Wikipedia:

Jan Železný (Czech pronunciation: [ˈjan ˈʒɛlɛzniː] ( listen)) (born 16 June 1966 in Mladá Boleslav, Czechoslovakia) is a Czech javelin thrower, world and Olympicchampion and world record holder in javelin throw. He holds all five of the top 5 javelin performances of all time.[1]

Železný won the gold at the 19921996 and 2000 Summer Olympic Games and silver in the 1988 Olympics as well as three World Championship titles; in 1993, 1995 and 2001. Because of his achievements he is widely considered to be the greatest javelin thrower ever.

Železný holds the world record, at 98.48 metres (323 ft 1 in) set in 1996, and the World Championships record of 92.80 m, set in 2001. As of 1 August 2005, Železný has made 52 throws over 90 meters, more than all other javelin throwers combined (32).[2] He is also the only athlete to throw more than 94 meters with the new type of javelin, something he achieved five times.[1]

During his career he has had many great battles against the like of Steve BackleySergey MakarovBoris HenrySeppo RätyRaymond Hecht and Aki Parviainen.

He planned to retire after the 2006 European Championships in Gothenburg, where he won the bronze with a throw of 85.92 m. He took leave of his career on 19 September 2006 on exhibition in Mladá Boleslav, the place where he started with athletics.

 

 

 

 

AS A COACH

 Tero Pitkämäki training with Jan Železný in a training camp in Potchefstroom, South Africa early 2012.

 

 

back to main page


Bookmark and Share